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Shakespeare's Sonnets

Poems (miscellaneous poems I)

1

1. Alas the grief and deadly woeful smart, The careful chance shapen afore my shert; The sorrowful tears, the sighs hot as fire, That cruel love hath long sucked from mine heart. And for reward of our great desire Disdainful doubleness have I for my hire. 2. O lost service, O pain ill rewarded, O pitifull heart with pain enlarged, O faithful mind, too suddenly assented, Return, alas since thou art not regarded. Too great a proof of true faith presented, Causeth by right such faith to be repented. 3. O cruel causer of undeserved change, By great desire unconstantly to range, Is this your way for proof of stedfastness? (Perdy you know the thing was not so strange By former proof) too much my faithfulness; What needeth then such coloured doubleness? 4. I have wailed thus, weeping in nightly pain, In sobs and sighs, Alas! and all in vain, In inward plaint and heart's woful torment. And yet, alas, thy cruelty and disdain Have set at nought a faithful true intent, And price hath privilege truth to prevent. 5. But though I starve, and to my death still mourn, And piecemeal in pieces though I be torn, And though I die yielding my wearied ghost, Shall never thing again make me return. I quit the enterprise of that that I have lost, To whom so ever lust for to proffer most.
1. Alas the grief and dedly wofull smert : The carefull chaunce shapen afore my shert ; The sorrowfull teares, the sighes hote as fyer, That cruell love hath long soked from myn hert. And for reward of our greate desire Disdaynful dowblenes have I for my hier. 2. O lost servis, O payn ill rewarded : O pitifull hert with payn enlarged : O faithfull mynde, too sodenly assented : Retourn, alas sithens thou art not regarded : Too great a prouf of true faith presented, Causeth by right suche faith to be repented. 3. O cruell causer of undeserved chaunge. By greet desire unconstantly to raunge : Is this your waye for prouf of stedfastnes ? (Perdy you knowe the thing was not so straunge By former prouff) too muche my faithfulnes ; What nedeth then suche coloured dowblenes ? 4. I have wailed thus, weping in nyghtly payn : In sobbes and sighes, Alas ! and all in vayn : In inward plaint and hertes wofull torment : And yet, alas, Io crueltie and disdayn Have set at noght a faithful true intent, 5. But though I sterve : and to my deth still morne : And pece mele in peces though I be torn : And though I dye yelding my weried gooste Shall never thing again make me retorn. I qwite the enterprise of that that I have lost, To whome so ever lust for to proffer moost. And price hath privilege trouth to prevent.

NOTES

the careful chance etc. = ?? OED gives shert as an old variant of short, but this does not help much. In Chaucer shert = shirt. Editors refer to Chaucer, The Knight's Tale, 1566 'That shapen was my deeth erst than my shert' which is interpreted as a proverbial expression, i.e. before my first shirt was made = before my birth. careful chance = fortune full of sorrow (care). for my hire = as a reward. assented = consenting. regarded = valued. Perdy = By God! From the French 'par Dieu!'. shall never thing = nothing shall ever. I quit the enterprise= I abandon the undertaking. To whom soever lust = to whoever wishes. to proffer most = to offer the most.

2

O restfull place, renewer of my smart; O labour's salve, increasing my sorrow; O body's ease, O troubler of my heart; Peaser of mind, of mine unquiet foe. Refuge of pain, rememberer of my woe, Of care comfort, where I despair my part; The place of sleep, wherein I do but wake. Besprent with tears, my bed, I thee forsake.
O restfull place : reneewer of my smart : O laboors salve : encreasing my sorowe : O bodyes ease : O troobler of my hart ; Peaser of mynde : of myne unquiet fo : Refuge of payene : remembrer of my wo : Of care coomefort : where I dispayer my part ; The place of slepe ; wherin I doo but wake. Bysprent with teares, my bedde I thee forsake.

NOTES

peaser = pacifier. Besprent = sprayed, drenched.

3

1 The restful place, reviver of my smart; The labour's salve, increasing my sorrow; The body's ease, and troubler of my heart; Quieter of mind, and my unquiet foe. Forgetter of pain, remembering my woe; The place of sleep, wherein I do but wake, Besprent with tears, my bed I thee forsake. 2 The frost, the snow, may not redress my heat; Nor yet no heat abate my fervent cold; I know nothing to ease my pains meet; Each care causeth increase by twenty fold. Reviving cares upon my sorrows old, Such overthwart affects they do me make, Besprent with tears, my bed for to forsake. 3 Yet helpeth it not : I find no better ease In bed or out; this most causeth my pain; Where most I seek how best that I may please, My most labour, alas, is all in vain. Yet that I gave I cannot call again; No place from me my grief away can take Wherefore, with tears, my bed, I thee forsake.
1 The restfull place, revyver of my smarte : The labors salve, incressyng my sorow : The bodys ese, and trobler of my hart : Quieter of mynd, and my unquyet foo : Fforgetter of payn, remembryng my woo : The place of slepe, wherin I do but wake Be sprent with teres, my bed I the forsake. 2 The frost, the snow, may not redresse my hete : Nor yet no heate abate my fervent colde : I know nothyng to ese my paynes mete : Eche care cawsythe increse by twenty fold : Revyvyng carys upon my sorows old, Suche overthwart affectes they do me make : By sprent with terys my bed for to forsake. 3 Yet helpythe yt not : I find no better ese In bed or owt ; thys moste cawsythe my payn : Where most I seke how beste that I may plese, My most labor, alas, ys all in vayn : Yet that I gave I cannot call agayn : No place fro me my greffe away can take Wherefore with terys my bed I the forsake.

NOTES

For stanza 1 see notes above. redress = put right, cure. meet = fitting. overthwart = contrary, hostile. call again = recall, ask to be returned. No place etc. = There is no place which can take my grief away from me, i.e. no distraction allows me to forget it.

4

1 Mine old dear enemy, my froward master, Afore that Queen, I caused to be accited, Which holdeth the divine part of nature, That like as gold, in fire he mought be tried. Changed with dolour, there I me presented With horrible fear, as one that greatly dreadeth A wrongful death, and justice always seeketh. 2 And thus I said: "Once my left foot Madame, When I was young I set within his reign; Whereby other than fiercly burning flame, I never felt but many a grievous pain; Torment I suffered, anger and disdain, That mine oppressed patience was past, And I mine own life hated at the last. 3 Thus hitherto have I my time passed In pain and smart. What ways profitable, How many pleasant days have me escaped; In serving this false liar so deceivable ? What wit have words so pressed and forceable, That may contain my great mishappiness, And just complaints of his ungentleness ? 4 O ! small honey, much aloes, and gall In bitterness have my blind life tasted His false sweetness, that turneth as a ball, With the amorous dance have made me traced; And where I had my thought, and mind ataced, From all earthly frailness, and vain pleasure, He took me from rest and set me in error. 5 He hath made me regard God much less than I ought And to my self to take right little heed, And, for a Woman, have I set at nought All other thoughts: in this only to speed; And he was only councillor of this deed; Always whetting my youthly desire On the cruel whetstone tempered with fire. 6 But alas where now had I ever wit ? Or else any other gift given me of nature ? That sooner shall change my wearied sprite, Than the obstinate will that is my ruler ? So robbed my liberty with displeasure This wicked traitor, whom I thus accuse, That bitter life have turned me in pleasant use. 7 He hath chased me thorough divers regions: Thorough desert woods, and sharp high mountains, Thorough froward people and straight pressions: Thorough rocky sees : over hills and plains : With weary travail, and laborous pains : Always in trouble and in tediousness, In all error and dangerous distress. 8 But neither he nor she my th'other foe, For all my flight did ever me forsake; That though timely death hath been too slow, That as yet it hath me not overtake; The heavenly goodness of pity do it slake. And note this, his cruel extreme tyranny, That feedeth him with my care and misery. 9 Since I was his, o'er rested I never, Nor look for to do, and eke the waky nights, The banished sleep, may no wise recover. By deceit, and by force, over my sprites, He is ruler; and since there never bell strikes Where I am, that I hear not, my plaints to renew, And he himself he knoweth that I say is true. 10. For never worms have an old stock eaten, As he my heart, where he is alway resident; And doth the same with death daily threaten; Thence come the tears, and the bitter torment, The sighs, the words, and eke the languishment, That annoy both me and peradventure other; Judge thou that knowest th'one and th'other. 11 Mine adversary, with grievous reproof, Thus he began : "Hear, Lady, th'other part: "That the plain truth from which he draweth aloof, This unkind man shall shew, ere that I part, In young age I took him from that art That selleth words, and maketh a clattering knight, And of my wealth I gave him the delight. 12 Now, shameth he not on me for to complain, That held him evermore in pleasant game, From his desire, that might have been his pain; Yet only thereby I brought him to some frame, Which, as wretchedness he doth greatly blame; And toward honour I quickened his wit, Where else, as a daskard, he might have sit. 13 He knoweth: that Atrides, that made Troy fright, And Hannibal, to Rome so troublous; Whom Homer honoured, Achilles that grete; And the African Scipion the famous; And many other, by much virtue glorious Whose fame and honour did bring them above, I did let fall, in base dishonest love. 14 And unto him, though he no deal worthy were, I chose right the best of many a million, That under the moon was never her peer Of wisdom, womanhood and discretion; And of my grace I gave her such a façon, And eke such a way I taught her for to teach That never base thought his heart might have reach. 15 Evermore thus to content his mistress, That was his only frame of honesty. I stirred him still toward gentleness, And caused him to regard fidelity; Patience I taught him in adversity; Such virtues he learned in my great school Whereof he repenteth, the ignorant fool. 16 These were the deceits and the bitter gall That I have used; the torment and the anger; Sweeter than for to enjoy any other in all. Of right good seed ill fruit I gather; And so hath he, that th'unkind doth further. I nourish a serpent under my wing, And of his nature now ginneth he to sting. 17 And for to tell at last my great service: From thousand dishonesties I have him drawn; That by my means in no manner of wise, Never vile pleasure hath him overthrown; Where in his deed, shame hath him always ynawen, Doubting report, that should come to her ear; Whom now he accuseth he wonted to fear. 18 What soever he hath of any honest custom Of her and me, that holdeth he every whit: But lo, there was never nightly phantom So far in error, as he is from his wit. To plain on us, he striveth with the bit Which may rule him, and do him pleasure and pain, And in one hour make all his grief remain. 19 But one thing there is above all other: I gave him wings, wherewith for to fly To honour and fame, and if he would farther Than mortal things, above the starry sky; Considering the pleasure that an eye Might give in earth, by reason of his love, What should that be that lasteth still above ? 20 And he the same himself hath said, or this: But now forgotten is both that, and I, That gave her him, his only wealth and bliss." And at this word, with deadly shright and cry "Thou gave her me," quod I, "but by and by" "Thou took her straight from me: that woe worth thee!" "Not I" quoth he; "but price, that is well worth." 21 At last: both each for himself concluded: I, trembling: but he, with small reverence: "Lo thus as we have now each other accused, "Dear lady, we wait only thy sentence." She smiling : "After thissaid audience "It liketh me," quod she, "to have heard your questions, "But longer time doth ask resolution."
1 Myne olde dere en'my, my froward master, Afore that Quene, I caused to be acited ; Whiche holdeth the divine parte of nature : That lyke as goolde, in fyre he mought be tryed. Changed with dolour, theare I me presented With horrible feare, as one that greatlye dreadith A wrongfull death, and justice always seekethe. 2 And thus I sayde : "once my lefte foote Madame, When I was yonge I sett within his reigne ; Whearbye other than fierlye burninge flame, I never felt but many a greevous payne ; Tourment I suffred, angre and disdayne, That myne oppressed patience was past, And I myne owne life hated at the last. 3 Thus hytherto have I my time passed In payne and smarte. What wayes proffitable : How many pleasant dayes have me escaped; In serving this false lyer so deceavable ? What witt have wordes so pressed and forceable, That may contayne my great myshappynesse, And just complayntes of his ungentlenesse ? 4 O ! small hony, much aloes, and gall : In bitternes have my blynde life taisted His fals swetenes, that torneth as a ball, With the amorous dawnce have made me traced ; And where I had my thought, and mynde ataced, From all erthely frailnes, and vain pleasur, He toke me from rest and set me in error. 5 He hath made me regarde God muche lesse then I ought And to my self to take right litle heede, And, for a Woman, have I set at nought All othr thoughtes : in this onely to spede ; And he was onely counceillor of this dede ; Alwayes whetting my youthely desyer On the cruell whetstone tempered with fier. 6 But alas where now had I ever wit ? Or els any othr gift geven me of nature ? That souner shall chaunge my weryed sprite, Then the obstinate will that is my rueler ? So robbed my libertie with displeasure This wicked traytor, whom I thus accuse, That bitter liffe have torned me in pleasaunt use. 7 He hath chased me thorough dyvers regions : Thorough desert wodes, and sherp high mountaignes, Thorough froward people and straite pressions : Thorough rocky sees : over hilles and playnes : With wery travaill, and laborous paynes : Always in trouble and in tediousnes, In all errour and daungerous distres. 8 But nother he nor she my tothr ffoo, For all my flyght did ever me forsake ; That though tymely deth hath ben to sloo, That as yet it hath me not overtake ; The hevynly goodenes of pitie do it slake. And note this, his cruel extreme tyranny, That fedeth hym with my care and mysery. 9 Syns I was his : owre rested I never, Nor loke for to do , and eke the waky nyghts, The bannysshed slepe, may no wyse recover. By decepte, and by force, over my sprites, He is rueler ; and syns there never bell strikes Where I ame, that I here not, my playntes to renewe, And he himself he knoweth that I say is true. 10. Ffor never wormes have an old stock eaten, As he my hert, wher he is alwaye resident ; And doeth the same with deth daely thretyn ; Thens come the teres, and the bitter torment, The sighes, the wordes, and eke the languisshement, That annoye boeth me and peradeventure othr ; Judge thou that knowest thone and thothr. 11 Myn adversary, with grevous reprouff, Thus he began : "Here, Lady, thothr part : "That the plain trueth from which he draweth alowff, This unkynd man shall shew, ere that I part, In yonge age I toke him from that art That selleth wordes, and maketh a clattering knyght, And of my welth I gave him the delight. 12 Nowe, shameth he not on me for to complain, That held him evermore in pleasaunt game From his desire, that myght have been his payne ; Yet onely thereby I broght him to some frame : Which, as wretchedness he doth greately blame ; And towerd honor I quickened his wit : Where els, as a daskard, he might have sitt. 13 He knoweth : that Atrides, that made Troye frete : And Hannyball, to Rome so trobelous : Whome Homere honoured, Achilles that grete : And the Affricane Scipion the famous : And many other, by much vertue glorious Whose fame and honor did bryng them above, I did let fall, in base dishonest love. 14 And unto him, though he no dele worthy ware, I chose right the best of many a mylion : That under the mone was never her pere Of wisdome, womanhede and discretion : And of my grace I gave her suche a façon, And eke suche a way I taught her for to teche That never base thought his hert myght have reche. 15 Evermore thus to content his maistres, That was his onely frame of honestie. I sterred him still towerd gentilnes, And caused him to regard fidelitie ; Patiens I taught him in adversitie ; Suche vertues he lerned in my great schole Wherof he repenteth, the ignoraunt ffole. 16 These were the deceptes and the bitter gall That I have used ; the torment and the anger ; Sweter then for to in joy any othr in all. Of right goode seede ill fruyte I gather ; And so hath he, that thunkynd doeth forther. I norisshe a serpent under my wyng, And of his nature now gynneth he to styng. 17 And for to tell at last my great servise : From thousand dishonestes I have him drawen ; That by my means in no maner of wyse, Never vile pleasure hath him overthrowen ; Where in his dede, shame hath him always ynawen, Dowbting reporte, that should come to her eare ; Whome now he accuseth he wounted to fere. 18 What soever he hath of any honest custume Of her and me, that holdeth he every wit : But lo, there was never nyghtely fantorme So ferr in errour, as he is from his wit : To plain on us ; He stryveth with the bit Which may ruell him, and do him pleasur and payn And in oon oure make all his grief remayn. 19 But oon thing there is above all othr : I gave him winges, wherwith for to flye To honor and fame : and if he would farther Then mortall thinges, above the starry sky ; Considering the pleasur that an Iye Myght geve in erthe, by reason of his love, What shuld that be that lasteth still above ? 20 And he the same himself hath sayed, or this : But now forgotten is boeth that, and I, That gave her him, his onely welth and blisse." And at this worde, with dedly shright and cry : "Thou gave her me," qwod I, "but by and by" "Thou toke her streight from me : that wo worth thee!" "Not I" quoth he ; "but price, that is well worth." 21 At last : boeth eche for himself concluded : I, trembling : but he, with small reverence : "Lo thus as we have nowe eche othr accused, "Dere lady, we wayt onely thy sentence." She smyling : "After thissaid audience "It liketh me," quod she, "to have herd your questions "But lenger tyme doeth aske resolution."

NOTES

1. Mine old dear enemy = Cupid, Love. Afore = before. that Queen = Venus. accited = summonsed. Which = that Queen. in fire he mought be tried = he might be tested in fire (a test for gold). dolour = sorrow. 2. That mine oppressed patience was past = That was too powerful for my already overstretched patience to endure. 3. deceivable = capable of deception. What wit = what power or capacity. pressed and forceable = pressed into service by me, and having some force. 4. aloes = a bitter juice; gall = a bitter substance, from the gall bladder. traced = travel. ataced - perhaps an error for araised = raised up. 5. to speed = to prosper. 6. So robbed etc. - the subject is 'this wicked traitor' (Cupid) of the following line. in pleasant use = who was accustomed to happiness. 7. pressions = passions? 8. she my th'other foe = she, the one I love. The heavenly goodness etc. = Pity, which is the goodness of heaven, holds back. slake = slacken, restrain (oneself). 9. o'er rested = overslept. eke = also; waky = wakeful. 10. old stock = rotten tree stump. 11. Lady =Venus (who is adjudicatress). that art that selleth words = empty boasting. a clattering knight = a braggart warrior? 12. shameth he not = he is not ashamed. I brought him to some frame = I gave a structure to his life. daskard = dastard? = coward. OED does not give this variant. sit = remain. 13. Atrides = Agamamnon. fright = frightened. Hannibal = a Carthaginian general. Achilles = hero of Homer's Iliad. grete = wept. the African Scipion = Scipio Africanus, a Roman general. 14. He no deal worthy were = he was in no way worthy. façon = appearance. reach = reached. 15. frame = motive. 16. for to enjoy any other in all = than the enjoyment of anything else at all. that th'unkind doth further = who promotes unnaturalness. ginneth = beginneth 17. in no manner of wise = in no way at all. ynawen = gnawn, eaten away at. doubting = fearing. to fear = to respect 18. every whit = in every way. i.e. all his honest and decent characteristics are dependent entirely on her and me. to plain = to complain. with the bit = against the bit (a metal curb placed in a horse's mouth by which it is controlled). 19. What should that be etc. =By how much more glorious are the eternal delights of 9divine) love. that art that selleth words = empty boasting. a clattering knight = a braggart warrior? 20. or this = ere this, before this. shright = shriek. quod I = said I. woe worth thee = may sorrow befall you! price = value, i.e. the beloved's inner worth. 21. thissaid = the aforesaid. But longer time etc. = A verdict requires a longer time to reach.

5

1 Farewell, the reign of cruelty: Though that with pain my liberty Dear have I bought, yet shall surety Conduit my thought of Joy's needy. 2 Of force I must forsake pleasure, A good cause just since I endure Thereby my woe: which be ye sure Shall therewith go me to recure. 3 I fare as one escaped that fleeeth; Glad that is gone, yet still feareth; Spied to be caught; and so dreadeth That he for nought his pain leeseth. 4 In joyfull pain rejoice mine heart Thus to sustain of each a part; Let not this song from thee astart; Welcome among my pleasant smart.
1 Farewell, the rayn of crueltie : Though that with pain my libertie Dere have I boght : yet shall suretie Conduyt my thoght of Joyes nede. 2 Of force I must forsake pleasure : A goode cause iust syns I endure Thereby my woo : which be ye sure Shall therewith goo me to recure. 3 I fare as oon escaped that fleith : Glad that is gone, yet still fereth Spied to be cawght : and so dredeth That he for nought his pain leseth. 4 In joyfull pain reioyse myn hert Thus to sustain of eche apart; Let not this song from the estert; Welcome emong my plaisaunt smert.

NOTES

1. surety = assurance, safety. Conduit my thought etc. - uncertain meaning. Tottel gives 'and woefully / Finished my fearful tragedy. Conduit probably = conduct, ie. guide my thoughts to what I truly need. 2. just = justly. Shall therewith go = which will help to. 3. Glad that is gone = Glad that he has fled ? Glad at that which has departed? Spied to be caught = if spied, in danger of being caught. leeseth = loseth. 4. of each = of joy and sorrow. astart= start up.

6

It may be good, like it who list, But I do doubt: who can me blame? For oft assured, yet have I missed; And now again I fear the same; The windy words, the eyes quaint game, Of sudden change maketh me aghast. For dread to fall I stand not fast. Alas I tread an endless maze That seeketh to accord two contraries; And hope still and nothing has Imprisonèd in liberties ; As one unheard, and still that cries, Always thirsty, and yet nothing I taste; For dread to fall I stand not fast. Assured, I doubt I be not sure; And should I trust to such surety That oft hath put the proof in ure, And never hath found it trusty? Nay Sir, in faith, it were great folly. And yet my life thus do I waste; For dread to fall I stand not fast.
It may be good, like it who list, But I do dowbt who can me blame : For oft assured, yet have I myst; And now again I fere the same; The wyndy wordes, the Ies quaynt game, Of soden chaunge maketh me agast ; For dred to fall I stond not fast. Alas I tred an endles maze That seketh to accorde two contraries ; And hope still and nothing hase Imprisoned in libertes ; As oon unhard, and still that cries : Alwaies thursty, and yet nothing I tast ; For dred to fall I stond not fast. Assured, I dowbt I be not sure ; And should I trust to suche suretie, That oft hath put the prouff in ure, And never hath founde it trusty ? Nay Sir in faith it were great foly. And yet my liff thus do I wast, For dred to fall I stond not fast.

NOTES

like it who list = let others approve of it who wish to. doubt = suspect. missed = failed. for dread to fall etc. = through fear of falling (failing) I cannot stand securely. That seeketh - i.e. I, who seek to. accord = bring to agreement. And hope still etc. = and I still hope, yet I still have nothing. doubt = suspect, fear that. sure = secure. put the proof in ure = put the experience into practice, have endured the experience.

7

Resound my voice: ye woods that hear me plain, Both hills and vales, causing reflection; And Rivers eke record ye of my pain, Which have ye oft forced, by compassion As Judges to hear mine exclamation: Among whom pity I find doth remain. Where I it seek, alas there is disdain. Oft ye Rivers, to hear my woeful sound Have stopt your course; and plainly to express Many a tear by moisture of the ground, The earth hath wept to hear my heaviness, Which causless to suffer without redress, The heavy oaks have roared in the wind. Each thing methought complaining in their kind. Why then helas doth not she on me rue? Or is her heart so hard, that no pity May in it sink my Joy for to renew? O stony heart, who hath thus joined thee? So cruel that art; cloaked with beauty; No grace to me from thee there may proceed, But as reward, death for to be my meed.
Resound my voyse ; ye wodes that here me plain : Boeth hilles and vales causing reflexion ; And Ryvers eke record ye of my pain : Which have ye oft forced by compassion, As Judges to here myn exclamation : Emong whome pitie I fynde doeth remayn : Where I it seke, Alas there is disdain. Oft ye Revers : to here my wofull sounde Have stopt your course : and plainly to expresse Many a tere by moystor of the grounde, The erth hath wept to here my hevenes : Which causles to suffre without redresse, The howyy okes have rored in the wynde : Eche thing methought complayning in their kynde. Why then helas doeth not she on me rew ? Or is her hert so herd, that no pitie May in it synke my Joye for to renew ? O stony hert, ho hath this joyned the ? So cruell, that art : cloked with beaultie ; No grace to me from the there may procede, But as rewarded deth for to be my mede.

NOTES

plain = complain. reflection = echo. which = who, i.e. the complainant of the previous lines. Where I it seek = Where I seek pity, i.e. in my beloved. Which causeless to suffer= who, without cause suffering. heavy = howyy of the manuscript is of uncertain meaning. rue = show pity. joined = made (as a joiner makes things). death for to be my meed = death shall be my recompense.

8

1 In faith I wot not well what to say, Thy chances been so wondrous; Thou Fortune, with thy diverse play, That causeth joyful dolourous; And eke the same right joyous; Yet though thy chain hath me enwrapt, Spite of thy hap, hap hath well happed! 2 Though thou me set for a wonder, And seekest thy change to do me pain, Men's mind yet may thou not order, And honesty, and it remain, Shall shine for all thy cloudy rain; In vain thou seekest to have trapped, Spite of thy hap, hap hath well happed ! 3 In hindering thou did'st further, And made a gap where was a stile; Cruel wiles been oft put under, Weening to lour, thou did'st smile. Lord! how thy self thou did'st beguile, That in thy cares wouldest me have lapped! Spite of thy hap, hap hath well happed!
1 In faith I wot not well what to say, Thy chaunces ben so wonderous ; Thou Fortune, with thy dyvers play, That causeth joyfull dolours ; And eke the same right joyus ; Yet though thy chayn hathe me enwrapt, Spite of thy hap, hap hath well hapt ! 2 Though thou me set for a wounder, And sekest thy chaunge to do me payn ; Mens mynd yet may thou not order : And honeste, and it remayne, Shall shyne for all thy clowdy rayn ; In vayn thou sekest to have trapped, Spite of thy hap, hap hath well hapt ! 3 In hindering thou diddest fourther, And made a gap where was a stile ; Cruell willes ben oft put under ; Wenyng to lowre thou diddist smyle. Lorde ! how thy self thou diddist begile, That in thy cares wouldest me have lapped ! Spite of thy hap, hap hath well hapt !

NOTES

In faith - a mild oath. I wot not = I know not. Thy chances = your (Fortune's) chance events. joyful dolorous = the joyful to be sorrowful. And eke the same = and in the same way the dolorous person to be etc. Spite of thy hap, hap hath well happed! = Despite these chances, events have turned out well for me. me set for a wonder = decided to set me up as a wondrous example. seekest thy change = seek by changes (of fortune). and it remain = if it remains stedfast. thou did'st further = you advanced my cause. made a gap where was a stile = by removing obstacle made it easier to proceed. wiles = tricks. But possibly 'wills' is intended. been = have been. put under = overturned, defeated. Weening = intending, thinking.

9

Madame, withouten many words, Once, I am sure, ye will or no: And if ye will, then leave your bourdes And use your wit, and show it so; And with a beck ye shall me call, And if of one that burneth alway Ye have any pity at all, Answer him fair with yea or nay. If it be yea, I shall be fain, If it be nay, friends as before; Ye shall an other man obtain And I mine own and your's no more.
Madame withouten many wordes Ons, I am sure, ye will or no : And if ye will, then leve your bordes And use your wit, and shew it so : And with a beck ye shall me call : And if of oon that burneth alwaye Ye have any pitie at all, Aunswer him faire with ye or nay. If it be ye, I shalbe fayne : If it be nay, frendes as before ; Ye shall an othr man obtain And I myn owne and youres no more.

NOTES

withouten = without. Once = on this occasion, now. ye will or no = you will agree or refuse (my amorous request). bourdes = mockery, jeers. show it so = show that you have wit (intelligence). with a beck = by beckoning. alway = always. I shall be fain = I will be eager. I mine own = I will no longer be infatuated with you.

10

1 Such hap as I am happèd in, Had never man of truth I ween; At me fortune list to begin To show that never hath been seen A new kind of unhappiness; Nor I cannot the thing I mean Myself express. 2 Myself express my deadly pain That can I well, if that mght serve; But when I have not help again, That know I not, unless I starve; For hunger still amidst my food Is so granted that I deserve To do me good. 3 To do me good what may prevail, For I deserve and not desire, And still of cold I me bewail And rakèd am in burnyng fire; For though I have, such is my lot,--- In hand to help that I require, It helpeth not. 4 It helpeth not, but to increase That, that by proof can be no more: That is, the heat that cannot cease, And that I have to crave so sore; What wonder if this greedy lust To ask and have, and yet therefore Refrain I must? 5 Refrain I must! What is the cause ? Sure as they say "So hawks be taught." But in my case lyeth no such claws, For with such craft I am not caught. Wherefore I say, and good cause why, With hapless hand, no man hath raught Such hap as I.
1 Such happe as I ame happed in, Had never man of trueth I wene ; At me fortune list to begyn, To shew that never hath ben sene, A new kynde of unhappenes ; Nor I cannot the thing I mene Myself expres. 2 Myself expresse my dedely pain That can I well, if that myght serve ; But when I have not helpe again That knowe I not, unles I starve ; For honger still a myddes my foode Is so graunted that I deserve To do me good. 3 To do me good what may prevaill, For I deserve and not desir, And still of cold I me bewaill And raked ame in burnyng fyer ; For tho I have, suche is my lotte,--- In hand to helpe that I require, It helpeth not. 4 It helpeth not, but to encrese That, that by prouff can be no more : That is the hete that cannot cesse, And that I have to crave so sore ; What wonder if this gredy lust To aske and have, and yet therefore Refrain I must ? 5 Refrain I must ! What is the cause ? Sure as they say "So hawkes be taught." But in my case laieth no such clause, For with suche craft I ame not caught : Wherefore I say and good cause why, With haples hand, no man hath raught Suche happe as I.

NOTES

1. Such hap etc. = such fortune as I now find I am enmeshed in. I ween = I think. list to = desired to. 2. But when I have not help again etc. - to end of stanza. - Of uncertain meaning. Possibly 'When you do not offer solace against this pain, I am like one starving amidst food, a deserving punishment for me. 3. For though I have -- in hand to help = though my beloved is at hand who might help?? 4. by proof = by experience. this greedy lust = What wonder that I suffer so, if this greedy lust is within me, and yet I must restrain myself. 5. no man hath raught = no one has obtained, acquired.

11

1 They flee from me, that sometime did me seek With naked foot, stalking in my chamber. I have seen them gentle, tame, and meek, That now are wild, and do not remember That sometime they put themself in danger To take bread at my hand; and now they range Busily seeking with a continual change. 2 Thanked be fortune it hath been otherwise Twenty times better; but once in special, In thin array, after a pleasaunt guise, When her loose gown from her shoulders did fall, And she me caught in her arms long and small, Therewith all sweetly did me kiss And softly said "Dear heart how like you this?" 3 It was no dream, I lay broad waking But all is turned, thorough my gentleness, Into a strange fashion of forsaking; And I have leave to go of her goodness; And she also to use new fangleness. But since that I so kindly am served, I would fain know what she hath deserved.
1 They fle from me, that sometyme did me seke With naked fote, stalking in my chambr. I have sene theim gentill, tame, and meke, That now are wyld, and do not remembr That sometyme they put theimself in daunger To take bred at my hand ; and nowe they raunge Besely seking with a continuell chaunge. 2 Thancked be fortune it hath ben othrewise Twenty tymes better ; but ons in speciall, In thyn arraye, after a pleasaunt gyse, When her lose gowne from her shoulders did fall, And she me caught in her armes long and small, Therewith all swetely did me kysse And softely saide : "Dere hert howe like you this?" 3 It was no dreme : I lay brode waking But all is torned, thorough my gentilnes, Into a straunge fasshion of forsaking ; And I have leve to go of her goodenes : And she also to use new fangilnes ; But syns that I so kyndely am served, I wold fain knowe what she hath deserved.

NOTES

1. with a continual change = being perpetually fickle. 2. In thin array = with diaphanous dress. after a pleasant guise = in a pleasant manner. 3. thorough = through. forsaking = rejecting. I have leave to go = I have been given my marching orders. of her goodness = through her consent (ironical). new-fangleness = novelty, innovation. kindly served = harshly dealt with, harshly treated . kindly = after my kind, or nature, and the expression is no doubt ironic, suggesting that the person who is capable of such behaviour deseves even worse treatment herself.

12

1 There was never nothing more me pained, Nor nothing more me moved, As when my sweetheart her complained, That ever she me loved. Alas the while ! 2 With piteous look she said, and sighed: "Alas what aileth me, "To love and set my wealth so light "On him that loveth not me." Alas the while ! 3 "Was I not well void of all pain "When that nothing me grieved ? "And now with sorrows I must complain, "And cannot be relieved. Alas the while ! 4 "My restfull nights and joyful days, "Since I began to love, "Be take from me; all thing decays "Yet cannot I remove." Alas the while ! 5 She wept and wrung her hands withall; The tears fell in my neck; She turned her face and let it fall, Scarcely therewith could speak. Alas the while ! 6 Her pains tormented me so sore That comfort had I none ; But cursed my fortune more and more To see her sob and groan. Alas the while !
1 There was never nothing more me payned, Nor nothing more me moved, As when my swetehert her complayned, That ever she me loved. Alas the while ! 2 With pituous loke she saide, and sighed : "Alas what aileth me, "To love and set my welth so light "On hym that loveth not me." Alas the while ! 3 "Was I not well voyde of all pain "When that nothing me greved ? "And nowe with sorrows I must complain, "And cannot be releved. Alas the while ! 4 "My restfull nyghtes and joyfull daies, "Syns I began to love, "Be take from me ; all thing decayes "Yet cannot I remove." Alas the while ! 5 She wept and wrong her handes withall ; The teres fell in my nekk ; She torned her face and let it fall, Scarsely therewith coulde speke. Alas the while ! 6 Her paynes tormented me so sore That comfort had I none ; But cursed my fortune more and more To se her sobbe and grone ; Alas the while !

NOTES

4. take = taken. all thing = everything. remove = escape, go somewhere else. 5. withal = as well; in addition to all this.

13

1 Patience! tho' I have not The thing that I require, I must of force, God wot, Forbear my most desire; For no ways can I find To saile against the wind. 2 Patience! do what they will To work me woe or spite; I shall content me still To think both day and night, To think and hold my peace, Since there is no redress. 3 Patience! withouten blame, For I offended nought; I know they know the same, Though they have changed their thought. Was ever thought so moved To hate that it hath loved ? 4 Patience! of all my harm, For fortune is my foe, Patience must be the charm To heal me of my woe. Patience without offence Is a painfull patience.
1 Patience, tho I have not The thing that I require, I must of force, God wot, Forbere my moost desire ; For no ways can I fynde To saile againste the wynde. 2 Patience, do what they will To worke me woo or spite ; I shall content me still To thyncke boeth day and nyte ; To thyncke and hold my peace, Syne there is no redresse. 3 Patience, withouten blame, For I offended nought ; I knowe they knowe the same, Though they have chaunged their thought. Was ever thought so moved To hate that it haith loved ? 4 Patience of all my harme For fortune is my foo ; Patience must be the charme To hele me of my woo Patience without offence Is a painfull patience.

NOTES

2. do what they = let my enemies (or lovers) do what they will. 3. withouten blame = I am without guilt. 4. of all my harm etc. = Patience must be the cure of all my sorrows. without offence = when one has not given cause or offence.

14

1 Patience for my device; Impatience for your part; Of contraries, the guise Is ever the overthwart. Patience, for I am true: The contrary for you. 2 Patience, a good cause why: You have no cause at all, Therefore you standeth awry, Perchance sometime to fall. Patience, then take him up, And drink of patience' cup. 3 Patience, no force for that, But brush your gown again. Patience, spurn not therat, Let no man know your pain. Patience, even at my pleasure, When yours is out of measure. 4 Th'other was for me: This patience is for you. Change when ye list let see For I have taken a new. Patience, with a good will, Is easy to fulfil.
1 Paciens for my devise ; Impatiens for your part ; Of contraries, the gyse Is ever the overthwart : Paciens for I ame true : The contrary for yew. 2 Paciens, a good cause why : You have no cause at all, Therefore you standeth awry, Perchaunce sometyme to fall : Paciens then take him up And drynck of paciens cupp. 3 Paciens, no force for that, But brusshe your gowne again : Pacience, spurne not therat : Let no man knowe your payne : Pacience, evyn at my pleasure, When youres is owte of mesure. 4 Thothr was for me : This patience is for you : Chaunge when ye list let se For I have taken a new ; Patience, with a good will, Is easy to fullfill.

NOTES

It is not known if this is a companion piece to the preceding poem. It is possibly not written by Wyatt. It may perhaps be interpreted as a dialogue between the woman and her rejected lover. He has patience, yet she espouses the contrary, impatience and annoyance. Its meaning is however opaque to all editors.